Food

FISH AND POTATO PORRIDGE FOR KIDS

In today’s article, I will be discussing on how to make “Fish and Potato Porridge For Kid”
Why Potatoes Are Good For Kids
Compared to rice and pasta, potatoes gives you a bigger bang for your buck in terms of healthy nutrition, it contains Carbohydrates and it also helps both brains and bodies and is the main source of energy for growth and sports.
It has Vitamin B, Which helps your body put carbs to work, providing energy and staying healthy, Vitamin C Essential for healthy skin, bones and hair.

POTATOES ARE NOT FATTENING

Potatoes are naturally fat-free; it’s what you put on top of them that may need to be enjoyed in moderation.
If you’re looking for lower-cal, lower-fat potatoes recipes
POTATOES ARE SATIATING

Kids get hungry so fast, so they need quality foods that will help them feel full and provide the energy they need to keep going. This is where Potatoes comes in!
Therefore, Nutrients really play an important role in the development of our body. Without proper nutrient, it really becomes difficult for us to survive. Food rich in carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals is really necessary to be a part of the diet. A diet containing all the nutrients in the proper amount is known as a balanced diet.

WHY IS FISH GOOD FOR KIDS?
Fish has a lot of high-quality protein, iron, and minerals. Some varieties (like salmon, anchovies, and sardines) contain omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for heart health and developing brains. Some (like salmon) even contain vitamin D, which can be hard to get through food.
Fish is rich in protein, the nutrient the body needs to build strong healthy muscles and bones as well as to help repair the scrapes and scratches that are part and parcel of growing up. Protein is needed by every part of the body, skin, hair, nails, heart, lungs as well as muscles and it is a vital nutrient for healthy development. Children need to eat protein food at lunch and dinner and fish can be a very healthy choice for them.

For the full article, kindly visit the link below http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/08/fish-potato-porridge-kids

 

 

Food

BASMATI JOLLOF RICE AND CHICKEN

When you hear the name Basmati Rice what comes into your mind? I’m sure by now you are reasoning why basmati rice and what is it all about? Not to worry, it’s nothing bad.

WHAT IS BASMATI RICE?

Basmati rice is one of the best known varieties of rice we have out there. The word “basmati” comes from the Sanskrit word “vasmati” which means “fragrant” or “aromatic.” Long-grained, extremely aromatic, with a light nutty flavour, basmati is mostly grown in the north of India and Pakistan, mainly using traditional growing methods. It is quite similar to long grain parboiled rice in terms of nutritional content but basmati rice is a soft rice variety hence if you try to prepare it with the method detailed for other Nigerian rice recipe, it will become disastrous!

3 PERFECT TIPS FOR BASMATI RICE

  1. You have to use the best quality Indian or Pakistani basmati rice, personally i used Tilda, but there are several other good quality brands available also.
  2. Rinse the rice with clean water, the water most not necessarily be clean like when rinsing Japanese rice. The essence of rinsing it is to get rid of some starch and to avoid sands as well. After that add little salt to the rice in the pot, before adding water for cooking. This method helps the salt absorb into the rice grains. Do not add salt after the rice is cooked, as your rice can taste salty.
  3. Use a tight fitting lid, or ideally, use aluminium foil, crimped tightly over the top of the sauce pan to make a good seal, so evaporation does not take place. The tightly covered pan lets the rice steam perfectly.
  4. I must say this, If you are to use basmati rice when preparing large quantities of rice, and add little water. It is safer to cook the rice in small batches in order to avoid it from becoming too watery. But if you still wish to cook it all at once, just add small amount not too much water when cooking ( what ever that comes out of it is all on you Lol)

follow the link below for the full article

http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/07/basmati-jollof-rice-chicken/ ‎

 

Dessert

CHEESE QUESADILLAS

A good 01 grilled cheese sandwich can sure hit the spot. The spot it hits is nothing else than the waist. Two slices of American cheese, two slices of white bread and 2tablespoon of butter add up to a hefty 27gramme of fat.
These South Western styles of quesadillas are a healthier alternative, plus they are well packed with the bright flavours of Salsa, Olive and two cheese.

STANDARD RECIPES: 414 Calories
27gramme Fat (59% of Calories)
FAT-TO-FIRM MAKEOVER: 134 Calories
3.9gramme Fat (26% of Calories

MAKES:
2 servings
TOTAL PREPARATION TIME:
20 minute.

When you hear the word Cheese Quesadilla, what should come to your mind is,
i. What kind of cheese used is in a quesadilla?
ii. What are the recipes needed in making it?
iii. How can one make cheese quesadillas?

Not to worry, I’m here for that. Just pay attention, sit back relax while I take you down to today’s article.

For the full article kindly visit the link below

http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/07/cheese-quesadillas/

Fruit Drinks

SWEET ORANGE VINAIGRETTE

Hello readers, today on the blog is, “SWEET ORANGE VINAIGRETTE”
The word Vinaigrette is made by mixing an oil with something acidic such as vinegar or lemon juice. The mixture can be enhanced with salt, herbs and/or spices. It is commonly used as a salad dressing, but can also be used as a marinade.

To get the complete recipes/info on this article, kindly visit our new website through the link below.

http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/07/sweet-orange-vinaigrette/

All comments are welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (FG, UNIDO move to tackle foodborne illnesses in Nigeria)

The Federal Ministry of Health in collaboration with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) under the European Union (EU) sponsored Nigeria Quality Infrastructure Project (NQIP) on Wednesday commenced a two-day capacity building workshop on food safety practices for food and non-food handlers across Kogi State.

Daily Trust reports that participants at the workshop include farmers, food handlers, non-food handlers, consumer associations and other stakeholders in agribusiness, amongst others.

Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole, at the commencement of the training in Lokoja, said the initiative was designed to impart knowledge on food safety practices with a view to addressing the burden foodborne diseases emanating from consumption of unsafe food had had on the country in recent times.

The minister who was represented on the occasion by Anthonia Okpara, a director of food, water and chemical division in the ministry, noted that similar training would be held subsequently in other states of the federation in order to entrench the culture of food safety from the point of production, processing and packaging down to consumption.

He said the country had in recent years been plagued with preventable foodborne disease outbreaks such as cholera, typhoid fever, Lassa fever and methanol poisoning as well as presence of aflatoxin in nuts and series consumed by unsuspecting members of the public, hence the need to sensitise food handlers on the need to imbibe food safety culture and hygiene practices.

“Over the past 20 years, food safety has become one major topic globally in the health sector considering the impact of unsafe food on the population especially on children below the age of five years, immunocompromised as well as the elderly.

He said the training was imperative as it forms part of the strategies for the implementation of the National Policy of Food Safety which amongst others aims at promoting safe food practices at the grassroots, improve the safety and quality of farm produce; reduce the foodborne disease burden of the country and also reduce the rate of rejection of food produced in the country at the international trade.

UNIDO’s National Expert on Food Safety, Tehinse John, said the training would go a long way in enhancing the acceptability of Nigeria’s agricultural products in the international market.

“This project is to build the capacity of Nigerians to be able to supply good and safe food products to the international market. We realise that of late that majority of our products, particularly Agric products are not allowed in the international market due to safety concerns.

“This project is aimed at correcting all the anomalies by building the capacities of stakeholders to produce goods that meet international requirements. Kogi State has been identified as one of the states that have potential to lead in Agric business. We feel that if the state is able to get it right in terms of improving food safety culture, then we will be able to improve agribusiness in the state,” he said.

On his part, Kogi State Governor Yahaya Bello said the need for education on food safety could not be over emphasised, saying that the quality of people’s depend largely on the quality of food they eat.

The governor, who was represented by his deputy, Elder Simon Achuba urged the participants to take the training seriously and ensure they imbibe food safety culture at the end of the day.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (What to know about food allergies in children)

Food allergy occurs, when the body immune system sees certain foods as harmful, thereby causing an unpleasant reaction. Food allergies can cause serious and deadly reactions in kids, if not properly handled. Dr. Oluwafunmilayo Funke Adeniyi, a paediatrician in the Department of Paediatrics, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) discussed food allergies in children, what triggers it and how to reduce the risk of kids developing it. GERALDINE AKUTU reports.

What is food allergy?
Food allergy is a clinical condition, where the body makes antibodies (Immunoglobulin E (IgE)) to a specific food. The job of the body’s immune system is to identify and destroy germs, such as bacteria or viruses that make you sick. A food allergy results, when the immune system mistakenly targets a harmless food protein – an allergen – as a threat and attacks it. Initial exposure to the food may not produce severe reaction, but the child may become sensitised and when the food is next eaten (or sometimes just comes in contact with the skin), it triggers an immune system response, which results in the release of histamine and other substances in the body. These cause various symptoms, depending on where in the body they are released.

Signs and Food allergy
The following are the signs and symptoms of food allergy regardless of the allergen:
Skin system: swelling, itching, warmth, redness and rashes, 
Respiratory system (breathing): coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain/tightness, throat tightness, hoarse voice, nasal congestion or hay fever-like symptoms (runny itchy nose, watery eyes and sneezing), difficulty in swallowing.

Gastrointestinal system (stomach): nausea, pain/cramps, vomiting, diarrhoea and some children may actually pass blood in the stools.

Cardiovascular system (heart): pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, and shock. Others: older children may describe anxiety, feeling of “impending doom”, headache, and metallic taste. The most dangerous symptoms of an allergic reaction, which is usually referred to as anaphylaxis are:

• Difficulty with breathing caused by swelling of the airways, including a severe asthma attack for people, who have asthma.
• Drop in blood pressure, causing dizziness, light-headedness, feeling faint or weak, or passing out. Both can lead to death, if untreated.

Having said this, it is important to note the symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, which are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms and very rarely, sudden collapse i.e. anaphylaxis.

How long does it take to have allergy in children?
An allergic reaction usually happens within minutes after exposure to an allergen, but sometimes it can take place several hours after exposure to the allergen. In children with the immune mediated or IgE mediated food, allergy symptoms occur within minutes up to two hours after ingestion of the food. These symptoms usually recur on exposure to the food on every occasion and may be mild or severe, associated with anaphylaxis. The symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, as such, are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms or (very rarely) sudden collapse.

What are the most common food allergies in children?
Allergy can occur to a single food or to many foods. Allergy to many foods is a more severe form of allergy, and is referred to as multiple food allergies.
The common allergenic foods i.e. food that induce allergies, include cow’s milk, dairy products, egg, seafood (fish and shrimps), wheat, soy and peanuts. The commonest food allergy in children is cow’s milk.

Is there a cure for food allergy?
There is no direct cure for food allergy. The condition is best managed with elimination diet i.e. avoidance or exclusion of the offending food from the diet and subsequent substitution. For example, in a child with cow’s milk protein allergy, the milk should be removed from the child’s diet and a substitute in the form of soya milk, or hydrolysed formula (i.e. milk that the protein has been broken down to peptides) or amino acid formula, which can readily be digested and does not cause reactions in the child.

When the child is up to six months and weaning is commenced, solids should be introduced gradually and one food at a time. This should be from the least allergenic foods, i.e. cereals, then vegetables and fruits, then chicken, eggs, fish and lastly nuts.

How can parents handle their children’s food allergies?
If a severe allergy has been identified in a child, it is important the parents ensure that the child avoid even the tiniest amounts of the trigger food. Very occasionally, reactions can occur, even when the child has had skin contact with the offending food. A fish-allergic person may react by being in a kitchen, where fish is being cooked. The parents should do gradual introduction of the allergenic foods in infancy, as described earlier.

Children, parents and caregivers should be educated on common ingredients, reading food labels and how to safely avoid allergens. Children and parents should also be aware of appropriate, safe, cost-effective, freely available and nutritionally adequate substitutes for the avoided foods.

As well as avoiding the offending food, the allergic child should be provided with appropriate emergency treatment, should accidental exposure occur. Depending on the severity of the reaction, this may be adrenaline to be given by injection, antihistamines, steroids, or all of these. The exact details of such treatment will need to be decided by the doctor in charge of the child. The parents should ensure that an allergy specialist or dietician, who is experienced in food allergies and paediatric gastroenterologist, sees the child regularly.

Children affected by severe food allergy can still participate in all normal activities, school, work or leisure, but the parents should give appropriate support and understanding.

Can a child outgrow food allergies?
Usually, children who have cow’s milk allergy become tolerant of cow’s milk, as they grow older and outgrow their allergy by the age of two to three years. Children are usually re-evaluated at regular intervals to see if they have developed tolerance. Generally, younger children with milk, soya and egg allergy are reviewed every six to 12 months and older children every one to two years. Tree nut, fish and shellfish allergy may be life long, but re-evaluation should be performed every two to four years to determine whether re-challenges are appropriate or exclusion needs to be continued.

Food

QUICK PASTA WITH VEGETABLE SAUCE

 

Pasta is generally a simple dish, but it comes in many varieties due to its versatility. Pasta is also prepared in light lunches, such as salads or large portion sizes for dinner. It can be prepared by hand or food processor and served hot or cold. Pasta sauces vary in taste, color, and texture. When choosing which type of pasta and sauce to serve together, there is a general rule regarding compatibility. Simple sauces like pesto are ideal for long and thin strands of pasta while tomato sauce combines well with thicker pasta.

Talking about Thicker and Chunkier Sauces, they have the better ability to cling onto the holes and cuts of short, tubular, twisted pasta. The extra sauce left on the plate after all of the pasta has been eaten is often mopped up with a piece of bread.

In cooking terms, a sauce is liquid, cream or semi-solid food served on or used in preparing other foods. Sauces are not normally consumed by themselves; they add flavor, moisture, and visual appeal to another dish. A sauce is a French word taken from the Latin salsa, meaning salted.

So in today’s article, I will be discussing on how to make a quick pasta with a vegetable sauce. You know, each traditional pasta dish is defined by a specific kind of pasta, a specific cooking style and a specific sauce or condiment. There are a large number of evolutions and variants of the traditional dishes. Pasta is also often used as a complementary ingredient in some soups, but these are not considered pasta dishes.

This tomato sauce comes together quickly and beats bottled sauce by a mile with less fat, less sodium, and more flavor.

Sit tight and relax while we move on to the article.

 

RECIPES

  1. 3 canned plum tomatoes (peeled)
  2. 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  1. 2 teaspoon chopped fresh basil or parsley
  2. 1 clove garlic (minced)
  3. 6-ounce medium shell pasta
  • ½ cup frozen green beans
  • 2/3 cup frozen corn
  1. 1 tablespoon crumbled feta cheese
  2. ¼ cup sweet red pepper (well seeded and chopped)

 

PROCEDURES

  1. In a clean food processor or blender, add together the tomatoes, lemon juice, and the olive oil, process all till they become smooth.
  2. Now is the time to add the garlic, the basil or parsley, process them using the turn on/off button just until the mixture is well combined, set aside.
  3. In a clean large saucepan of boiling water, cook the pasta for about 5minutes, when this is done, add the green beans and cook for 2minutes, after that add the corn and pepper and cook for 1minutes or till the pasta is well cooked and all other vegetables added are crisp-tender.
  4. Drain well and transfer it into a large bowl (remember anything you are using in cooking must all be washed and clean to avoid sands in the meal).
  5. Add the tomato mixture and the feta cheese, toss to combine. After that, it is ready for consumption.

SERVINGS PER RECIPE: 2

HINT

This dish can be packed in an airtight container and served cold as a pasta salad. This pasta dish can be accompanied with Garlic Bread Sticks and Melba Toast, in order to give it a savory taste.

 

Enjoy This Mouth Watery Dish! Happy Cooking. See You All Next Week

Don’t Forget to Visit Our New Website www.foodieafricana.com

Enjoy Your Weekends.

Foodie Update, Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Why we should stop eating wheat foods)

We will take a brief vacation today from the ongoing running series on CHRONIC INSOMNIA AND TRAINLOAD OF TROUBLES, which has run in two parts. The series is yielding ground to two publications, which have been making the rounds in many chat groups on the social media, including some of the friendship groups to which I belong.

When I first read about the dangers of eating wheat, I almost responded like a Doubting Thomas. Wheat?, I wondered. We have eaten wheat since goodness knows when! Until the Nigerian bread market became fraudulent, mixing white flour with wheat flour and passing it off as whole wheat flour and bread, I ate wheat bread for breakfast almost everyday. The shocking discovery is that man has now done to wheat what they have done, and are doing, to other food crops, modifying them from the way Mother Nature gave us these food crops and transforming them into states that would make them grow faster, more resistant to infections, keep longer and yield more money in the market. Quite naturally, the transformation alters, also, the natural ratios in which the constituents co-exist, and yield new radiations which the body now has to adapt to.

The second article, on asparagus, a long-known kidney cleansing herb, is considered for a mention in this column in the state in which it has been lifted from the social media because it may have, as suggested, an important role to play in the cure of cancer and other diseases which plague us today not only in Nigeria but worldwide.

My apologies go to the authors of these articles and to other original sources, which may have been lost through posting and reposting on the social media. Because of this it is not possible to give them their due credit for the publication. Nevertheless, I thought of republishing them because it is the wish of this authors and sources that this be done because of the health they believe doing so will afford the health of humanity

Foodie Naija Update, Foodie Naija Updates, Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Ethiopia denies emergency food aid will run out within weeks)

Ethiopia has denied suggestions by UN officials that it will run out of emergency food aid for millions of people by the end of this month.

The UN’s World Food Programme said 7.8 million people affected by drought would be left without food assistance.

But Ethiopian officials put the number of those affected at 1.7 million and said they would receive new help either from donors or the government.

Ethiopia has been struggling following successive failed rains.

Famine has been declared in South Sudan, and there have been warnings of famine in north-east Nigeria, Yemen and Somalia.

Ethiopia’s commissioner for disaster risk management Mitiku Kassa said: “It’s true that in some areas food will run out by the end of the month but this will only affect around 1.7 million people.

“We expect the donor community to step in to fill that gap and we are hopeful. But if they fail to do that, we will have to use some of our development budget to provide emergency assistance to our people.”

  • Can Ethiopia cope with worst drought in decades?

Earlier reports suggested that the Ethiopian government did not have the funds to cope by itself, although analysts have acknowledged it has got better at coping with droughts than in previous years.

The government allocated $381m (£300m) extra over the last two years, but aid experts have questioned whether this can be sustained for a third year.

Ethiopia is in a “dire situation”, according to John Aylieff of the World Food Programme.

“We’ve got food running out nationally at the end of June,” he told reporters on Friday.

“That means the 7.8 million people who are in need of humanitarian food assistance in Ethiopia will see that distribution cut abruptly at the end of June.”

His words were echoed by John Graham, of Save the Children

He told AFP news agency: “After [the food runs out], we don’t know what is going to happen. And without that basic food then you will have problem falling into severe malnutrition because people are not getting any food.

“These children become severely malnourished and that’s where you have a very dangerous situation.

Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Free Range Poultry Production Rising in Zimbabwe)

ZIMBABWE – The growing interest in indigenous foods by many Zimbabweans could be the break that local free-range poultry farmers have been waiting for in a market that has been dominated by hybrids.Over the past five years or so, numerous traditional food eateries have been opened, while hotels have been putting traditional dishes on their menu. This has served to push demand even in supermarkets as some people prefer to cook for themselves at home instead of spending a small fortune on one meal.

Such is the rising popularity for meals that include free-range chicken, guinea fowl, turkey, rabbit and duck meat to go along with traditional starches such as isitshwala samabele (sorghum) and brown rice.

While almost every household in rural areas has always kept free-range chickens for food and a few have sold a bird here and there to help raise money for use around the home, commercial free-range chicken production is a fairly new concept in most areas, according to Chronicle.

This has led to the rise of organisations such as the Zimbabwe Free-range Poultry Producers’ Association that seeks to help farmers take up free-range farming as a way to grow financial and food self-sufficiency in line with tenets of Zim-Asset.

ZFRPPA secretary general Beauty Jiji says free-range poultry farming can empower women and youths to produce enough to feed themselves and the nation thus creating employment as well as food self-sufficiency.

“Free range birds are natural, healthy and tastier than broiler chickens. So while broilers and layers are easier to produce, free-range products can competitively enter the market if given the chance,” she said.

Free-ranging is simple and economically viable when it comes to feeding and Ms Jiji’s organisation has been recruiting and training farmers on rearing free-range birds and other animals such as rabbits, goats and cattle. Farmers have also been taught cheap and easy ways to prepare feed for their birds.

Free range chickens can feed on a normal diet of grass, worms and bugs as they are allowed to freely roam about and access sunshine for long stretches of time each day. Enough time to source their daily protein is a requirement to ensure optimal growth.

There are, however plenty of others foods that free-range birds can feed on, which include small grains such as millet, sorghum and ground maize as well as fish meal, cotton seed, sunflower cake, maize germ and bone meal.

These are foods that farmers can grow and prepare on their own at minimum cost, and therefore, are affordable to rural farmers. Experts say farmers can actually produce enough small grains to feed themselves as well as their chickens thus reducing their food bill while reaping their nutritional benefits.

While most members of ZFRPPA are still producing on a small scale, Ms Jiji says there are some members who now have more than 3000 birds and have sourced markets for their produce.

The problem however has been maintaining a consistent supply once a market is found.

“We have the opportunity to supply the local market. Last year we got a deal to supply a local supermarket but we could not go back because our farmers failed to consistently supply the agreed number of chickens every week,” said Ms Jiji.

She said there is need to change the mindset of women and youths who are practicing free-range farming so that they understand how commercial production works.

“Once we have organised ourselves, we can then start to produce seriously and be able to meet demand consistently,” she added.