Foodie Update

The Food Standards Agency has published updated advice on how safe it is to eat raw eggs.

Health experts claim it is now safe for pregnant women, children and infants to eat raw eggs, or foods containing them.

This updated advice, which is based on scientific evidence, will please many women who have previously been told they couldn’t enjoy dishes including eggs benedict and cookie dough desserts.

Past belief was eating raw or lightly cooked eggs risked causing serious illness.

Heather Hancock, chairman of the Food Standards Agency, said: “It’s good news that now even vulnerable groups can safely eat UK eggs without needing to hard-boil them, so long as they bear the British Lion mark.

Read more at our new site: http://www.foodieafricana.com/foodie-update-safe-eat-raw-eggs/

Advertisements
Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (World Food Day: Everyone should embrace farming)

The Secretary, Agricultural and Rural Development Secretariat in the FCT, Mr Stanley Nzekwe, has urged residents to be actively involved in agriculture activities to ensure food security.
Nzekwe spoke in a briefing with newsmen on Sunday in Abuja as part of closing activities marking this year’s World Food Day.

According to him, active engagement in agriculture activity will help to cushion the effect of food insufficiency.
The theme of 2017 World Food Day is “Change the Future of Migration: Invest in Food Security and Rural Development.” The secretary noted that the whole essence of life revolved around food and shelter.
He said “this year’s World Food Day was anchored around President Muhammadu Buhari’s promise to Nigerians about self-sufficiency in food production and the call on us to feed ourselves.
“So, I am urging FCT residents and indeed the entire Nigerians to know that whatever you do in life is geared toward feeding your stomach.

Read More at http://www.foodieafricana.com/foodie-update-world-food-day-everyone-embrace-farming/

Foodie Update, Healthy Eating

FOODIE UPDATE (Is Beef Processing Future a Meatless One?)

There’s a new burger in town, and the folks at Impossible Foods think that it’s the future of meat.

The California-based food business has announced that its Oakland plant is now online, marking the burgeoning company’s first large scale plant operation. After it ramps up, Impossible says the factory will have the capacity to churn out a million pounds of meat per month. But it’s not just any meat – these burgers are plant-based, and the company is betting 68,000 square feet on their success.

The Impossible Burger is being touted as the first plant-based “burger” that accurately emulates the flavours, textures, and aromas of real grilled hamburger meat. But the big difference is in its sustainability: Impossible’s website says that, compared to cows, their burger uses “95% less land, 74% less water, and creates 87% fewer greenhouse gas emissions.” The company hopes to create an alternative burger that relies on fewer resources but also uses science to make it “bleed” like real meat.

Follow this link for the full version of this  update

http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/09/foodie-update-beef-processing-future-meatless-one/

Foodie Update, Healthy Eating

FOODIE UPDATE (Bird Flu Spreads)

Bird flu has continued to spread in South Africa as more cases of the outbreak were recorded in six of the nine provinces, authorities said on Sunday.

To date, more than 600,000 birds have been culled, according to the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF).

The recent outbreaks of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 virus have sent shock waves through the poultry industry in South Africa after it was first detected in June.

South Africa had never reported an outbreak of bird flu before.

TO GET  A COMPLETE DETAIL OF THIS UPDATE VISIT THIS BELOW

http://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/09/foodie-update-bird-flu-spreads/

 

Foodie Update, Healthy Eating

MEAT SELLERS AND FORMALIN

I do not know how many of you received this message from a purportedly good Samaritan that meat sellers now use formalin to repel flies from meat. The message advised consumers to patronise butchers with flies around their meat as that is a clear sign of formalin-free meat.

According to the message on the social media, “People are using formalin, the chemical used to preserve dead bodies in preserving meat as it keeps flies away. When I asked a pharmacist, Capt. Kenneth, remember of UPDF, he said it is possible.”

Continuing, “This is a national public health issue. After my friend’s wife lost a baby through miscarriage and investigations showed the presence of formalin in her blood. When consumed, formalin goes to the liver and destroys it.”

Appealing to consumers, the author in the message stated, “Please, people of God, this is serious. When you go to buy meat, go to a butcher that has flies around. Use this as the only way to confirm that there is no formalin present. If the meat is without flies, what is keeping them away is formalin. Be informed. Share this information please and save life.”

For the complete article on this post kindly visit our new website by following the link below.

MEAT SELLERS AND FORMALINhttp://www.foodieafricana.com/2017/09/meat-sellers-formalin/

Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (FG, UNIDO move to tackle foodborne illnesses in Nigeria)

The Federal Ministry of Health in collaboration with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) under the European Union (EU) sponsored Nigeria Quality Infrastructure Project (NQIP) on Wednesday commenced a two-day capacity building workshop on food safety practices for food and non-food handlers across Kogi State.

Daily Trust reports that participants at the workshop include farmers, food handlers, non-food handlers, consumer associations and other stakeholders in agribusiness, amongst others.

Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole, at the commencement of the training in Lokoja, said the initiative was designed to impart knowledge on food safety practices with a view to addressing the burden foodborne diseases emanating from consumption of unsafe food had had on the country in recent times.

The minister who was represented on the occasion by Anthonia Okpara, a director of food, water and chemical division in the ministry, noted that similar training would be held subsequently in other states of the federation in order to entrench the culture of food safety from the point of production, processing and packaging down to consumption.

He said the country had in recent years been plagued with preventable foodborne disease outbreaks such as cholera, typhoid fever, Lassa fever and methanol poisoning as well as presence of aflatoxin in nuts and series consumed by unsuspecting members of the public, hence the need to sensitise food handlers on the need to imbibe food safety culture and hygiene practices.

“Over the past 20 years, food safety has become one major topic globally in the health sector considering the impact of unsafe food on the population especially on children below the age of five years, immunocompromised as well as the elderly.

He said the training was imperative as it forms part of the strategies for the implementation of the National Policy of Food Safety which amongst others aims at promoting safe food practices at the grassroots, improve the safety and quality of farm produce; reduce the foodborne disease burden of the country and also reduce the rate of rejection of food produced in the country at the international trade.

UNIDO’s National Expert on Food Safety, Tehinse John, said the training would go a long way in enhancing the acceptability of Nigeria’s agricultural products in the international market.

“This project is to build the capacity of Nigerians to be able to supply good and safe food products to the international market. We realise that of late that majority of our products, particularly Agric products are not allowed in the international market due to safety concerns.

“This project is aimed at correcting all the anomalies by building the capacities of stakeholders to produce goods that meet international requirements. Kogi State has been identified as one of the states that have potential to lead in Agric business. We feel that if the state is able to get it right in terms of improving food safety culture, then we will be able to improve agribusiness in the state,” he said.

On his part, Kogi State Governor Yahaya Bello said the need for education on food safety could not be over emphasised, saying that the quality of people’s depend largely on the quality of food they eat.

The governor, who was represented by his deputy, Elder Simon Achuba urged the participants to take the training seriously and ensure they imbibe food safety culture at the end of the day.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (What to know about food allergies in children)

Food allergy occurs, when the body immune system sees certain foods as harmful, thereby causing an unpleasant reaction. Food allergies can cause serious and deadly reactions in kids, if not properly handled. Dr. Oluwafunmilayo Funke Adeniyi, a paediatrician in the Department of Paediatrics, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) discussed food allergies in children, what triggers it and how to reduce the risk of kids developing it. GERALDINE AKUTU reports.

What is food allergy?
Food allergy is a clinical condition, where the body makes antibodies (Immunoglobulin E (IgE)) to a specific food. The job of the body’s immune system is to identify and destroy germs, such as bacteria or viruses that make you sick. A food allergy results, when the immune system mistakenly targets a harmless food protein – an allergen – as a threat and attacks it. Initial exposure to the food may not produce severe reaction, but the child may become sensitised and when the food is next eaten (or sometimes just comes in contact with the skin), it triggers an immune system response, which results in the release of histamine and other substances in the body. These cause various symptoms, depending on where in the body they are released.

Signs and Food allergy
The following are the signs and symptoms of food allergy regardless of the allergen:
Skin system: swelling, itching, warmth, redness and rashes, 
Respiratory system (breathing): coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain/tightness, throat tightness, hoarse voice, nasal congestion or hay fever-like symptoms (runny itchy nose, watery eyes and sneezing), difficulty in swallowing.

Gastrointestinal system (stomach): nausea, pain/cramps, vomiting, diarrhoea and some children may actually pass blood in the stools.

Cardiovascular system (heart): pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, and shock. Others: older children may describe anxiety, feeling of “impending doom”, headache, and metallic taste. The most dangerous symptoms of an allergic reaction, which is usually referred to as anaphylaxis are:

• Difficulty with breathing caused by swelling of the airways, including a severe asthma attack for people, who have asthma.
• Drop in blood pressure, causing dizziness, light-headedness, feeling faint or weak, or passing out. Both can lead to death, if untreated.

Having said this, it is important to note the symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, which are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms and very rarely, sudden collapse i.e. anaphylaxis.

How long does it take to have allergy in children?
An allergic reaction usually happens within minutes after exposure to an allergen, but sometimes it can take place several hours after exposure to the allergen. In children with the immune mediated or IgE mediated food, allergy symptoms occur within minutes up to two hours after ingestion of the food. These symptoms usually recur on exposure to the food on every occasion and may be mild or severe, associated with anaphylaxis. The symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, as such, are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms or (very rarely) sudden collapse.

What are the most common food allergies in children?
Allergy can occur to a single food or to many foods. Allergy to many foods is a more severe form of allergy, and is referred to as multiple food allergies.
The common allergenic foods i.e. food that induce allergies, include cow’s milk, dairy products, egg, seafood (fish and shrimps), wheat, soy and peanuts. The commonest food allergy in children is cow’s milk.

Is there a cure for food allergy?
There is no direct cure for food allergy. The condition is best managed with elimination diet i.e. avoidance or exclusion of the offending food from the diet and subsequent substitution. For example, in a child with cow’s milk protein allergy, the milk should be removed from the child’s diet and a substitute in the form of soya milk, or hydrolysed formula (i.e. milk that the protein has been broken down to peptides) or amino acid formula, which can readily be digested and does not cause reactions in the child.

When the child is up to six months and weaning is commenced, solids should be introduced gradually and one food at a time. This should be from the least allergenic foods, i.e. cereals, then vegetables and fruits, then chicken, eggs, fish and lastly nuts.

How can parents handle their children’s food allergies?
If a severe allergy has been identified in a child, it is important the parents ensure that the child avoid even the tiniest amounts of the trigger food. Very occasionally, reactions can occur, even when the child has had skin contact with the offending food. A fish-allergic person may react by being in a kitchen, where fish is being cooked. The parents should do gradual introduction of the allergenic foods in infancy, as described earlier.

Children, parents and caregivers should be educated on common ingredients, reading food labels and how to safely avoid allergens. Children and parents should also be aware of appropriate, safe, cost-effective, freely available and nutritionally adequate substitutes for the avoided foods.

As well as avoiding the offending food, the allergic child should be provided with appropriate emergency treatment, should accidental exposure occur. Depending on the severity of the reaction, this may be adrenaline to be given by injection, antihistamines, steroids, or all of these. The exact details of such treatment will need to be decided by the doctor in charge of the child. The parents should ensure that an allergy specialist or dietician, who is experienced in food allergies and paediatric gastroenterologist, sees the child regularly.

Children affected by severe food allergy can still participate in all normal activities, school, work or leisure, but the parents should give appropriate support and understanding.

Can a child outgrow food allergies?
Usually, children who have cow’s milk allergy become tolerant of cow’s milk, as they grow older and outgrow their allergy by the age of two to three years. Children are usually re-evaluated at regular intervals to see if they have developed tolerance. Generally, younger children with milk, soya and egg allergy are reviewed every six to 12 months and older children every one to two years. Tree nut, fish and shellfish allergy may be life long, but re-evaluation should be performed every two to four years to determine whether re-challenges are appropriate or exclusion needs to be continued.

Foodie Update, Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Why we should stop eating wheat foods)

We will take a brief vacation today from the ongoing running series on CHRONIC INSOMNIA AND TRAINLOAD OF TROUBLES, which has run in two parts. The series is yielding ground to two publications, which have been making the rounds in many chat groups on the social media, including some of the friendship groups to which I belong.

When I first read about the dangers of eating wheat, I almost responded like a Doubting Thomas. Wheat?, I wondered. We have eaten wheat since goodness knows when! Until the Nigerian bread market became fraudulent, mixing white flour with wheat flour and passing it off as whole wheat flour and bread, I ate wheat bread for breakfast almost everyday. The shocking discovery is that man has now done to wheat what they have done, and are doing, to other food crops, modifying them from the way Mother Nature gave us these food crops and transforming them into states that would make them grow faster, more resistant to infections, keep longer and yield more money in the market. Quite naturally, the transformation alters, also, the natural ratios in which the constituents co-exist, and yield new radiations which the body now has to adapt to.

The second article, on asparagus, a long-known kidney cleansing herb, is considered for a mention in this column in the state in which it has been lifted from the social media because it may have, as suggested, an important role to play in the cure of cancer and other diseases which plague us today not only in Nigeria but worldwide.

My apologies go to the authors of these articles and to other original sources, which may have been lost through posting and reposting on the social media. Because of this it is not possible to give them their due credit for the publication. Nevertheless, I thought of republishing them because it is the wish of this authors and sources that this be done because of the health they believe doing so will afford the health of humanity

Foodie Naija Update, Foodie Naija Updates, Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Ethiopia denies emergency food aid will run out within weeks)

Ethiopia has denied suggestions by UN officials that it will run out of emergency food aid for millions of people by the end of this month.

The UN’s World Food Programme said 7.8 million people affected by drought would be left without food assistance.

But Ethiopian officials put the number of those affected at 1.7 million and said they would receive new help either from donors or the government.

Ethiopia has been struggling following successive failed rains.

Famine has been declared in South Sudan, and there have been warnings of famine in north-east Nigeria, Yemen and Somalia.

Ethiopia’s commissioner for disaster risk management Mitiku Kassa said: “It’s true that in some areas food will run out by the end of the month but this will only affect around 1.7 million people.

“We expect the donor community to step in to fill that gap and we are hopeful. But if they fail to do that, we will have to use some of our development budget to provide emergency assistance to our people.”

  • Can Ethiopia cope with worst drought in decades?

Earlier reports suggested that the Ethiopian government did not have the funds to cope by itself, although analysts have acknowledged it has got better at coping with droughts than in previous years.

The government allocated $381m (£300m) extra over the last two years, but aid experts have questioned whether this can be sustained for a third year.

Ethiopia is in a “dire situation”, according to John Aylieff of the World Food Programme.

“We’ve got food running out nationally at the end of June,” he told reporters on Friday.

“That means the 7.8 million people who are in need of humanitarian food assistance in Ethiopia will see that distribution cut abruptly at the end of June.”

His words were echoed by John Graham, of Save the Children

He told AFP news agency: “After [the food runs out], we don’t know what is going to happen. And without that basic food then you will have problem falling into severe malnutrition because people are not getting any food.

“These children become severely malnourished and that’s where you have a very dangerous situation.

Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Free Range Poultry Production Rising in Zimbabwe)

ZIMBABWE – The growing interest in indigenous foods by many Zimbabweans could be the break that local free-range poultry farmers have been waiting for in a market that has been dominated by hybrids.Over the past five years or so, numerous traditional food eateries have been opened, while hotels have been putting traditional dishes on their menu. This has served to push demand even in supermarkets as some people prefer to cook for themselves at home instead of spending a small fortune on one meal.

Such is the rising popularity for meals that include free-range chicken, guinea fowl, turkey, rabbit and duck meat to go along with traditional starches such as isitshwala samabele (sorghum) and brown rice.

While almost every household in rural areas has always kept free-range chickens for food and a few have sold a bird here and there to help raise money for use around the home, commercial free-range chicken production is a fairly new concept in most areas, according to Chronicle.

This has led to the rise of organisations such as the Zimbabwe Free-range Poultry Producers’ Association that seeks to help farmers take up free-range farming as a way to grow financial and food self-sufficiency in line with tenets of Zim-Asset.

ZFRPPA secretary general Beauty Jiji says free-range poultry farming can empower women and youths to produce enough to feed themselves and the nation thus creating employment as well as food self-sufficiency.

“Free range birds are natural, healthy and tastier than broiler chickens. So while broilers and layers are easier to produce, free-range products can competitively enter the market if given the chance,” she said.

Free-ranging is simple and economically viable when it comes to feeding and Ms Jiji’s organisation has been recruiting and training farmers on rearing free-range birds and other animals such as rabbits, goats and cattle. Farmers have also been taught cheap and easy ways to prepare feed for their birds.

Free range chickens can feed on a normal diet of grass, worms and bugs as they are allowed to freely roam about and access sunshine for long stretches of time each day. Enough time to source their daily protein is a requirement to ensure optimal growth.

There are, however plenty of others foods that free-range birds can feed on, which include small grains such as millet, sorghum and ground maize as well as fish meal, cotton seed, sunflower cake, maize germ and bone meal.

These are foods that farmers can grow and prepare on their own at minimum cost, and therefore, are affordable to rural farmers. Experts say farmers can actually produce enough small grains to feed themselves as well as their chickens thus reducing their food bill while reaping their nutritional benefits.

While most members of ZFRPPA are still producing on a small scale, Ms Jiji says there are some members who now have more than 3000 birds and have sourced markets for their produce.

The problem however has been maintaining a consistent supply once a market is found.

“We have the opportunity to supply the local market. Last year we got a deal to supply a local supermarket but we could not go back because our farmers failed to consistently supply the agreed number of chickens every week,” said Ms Jiji.

She said there is need to change the mindset of women and youths who are practicing free-range farming so that they understand how commercial production works.

“Once we have organised ourselves, we can then start to produce seriously and be able to meet demand consistently,” she added.