Foodie Update, Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Why we should stop eating wheat foods)

We will take a brief vacation today from the ongoing running series on CHRONIC INSOMNIA AND TRAINLOAD OF TROUBLES, which has run in two parts. The series is yielding ground to two publications, which have been making the rounds in many chat groups on the social media, including some of the friendship groups to which I belong.

When I first read about the dangers of eating wheat, I almost responded like a Doubting Thomas. Wheat?, I wondered. We have eaten wheat since goodness knows when! Until the Nigerian bread market became fraudulent, mixing white flour with wheat flour and passing it off as whole wheat flour and bread, I ate wheat bread for breakfast almost everyday. The shocking discovery is that man has now done to wheat what they have done, and are doing, to other food crops, modifying them from the way Mother Nature gave us these food crops and transforming them into states that would make them grow faster, more resistant to infections, keep longer and yield more money in the market. Quite naturally, the transformation alters, also, the natural ratios in which the constituents co-exist, and yield new radiations which the body now has to adapt to.

The second article, on asparagus, a long-known kidney cleansing herb, is considered for a mention in this column in the state in which it has been lifted from the social media because it may have, as suggested, an important role to play in the cure of cancer and other diseases which plague us today not only in Nigeria but worldwide.

My apologies go to the authors of these articles and to other original sources, which may have been lost through posting and reposting on the social media. Because of this it is not possible to give them their due credit for the publication. Nevertheless, I thought of republishing them because it is the wish of this authors and sources that this be done because of the health they believe doing so will afford the health of humanity

Foodie Naija Update, Foodie Naija Updates, Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Ethiopia denies emergency food aid will run out within weeks)

Ethiopia has denied suggestions by UN officials that it will run out of emergency food aid for millions of people by the end of this month.

The UN’s World Food Programme said 7.8 million people affected by drought would be left without food assistance.

But Ethiopian officials put the number of those affected at 1.7 million and said they would receive new help either from donors or the government.

Ethiopia has been struggling following successive failed rains.

Famine has been declared in South Sudan, and there have been warnings of famine in north-east Nigeria, Yemen and Somalia.

Ethiopia’s commissioner for disaster risk management Mitiku Kassa said: “It’s true that in some areas food will run out by the end of the month but this will only affect around 1.7 million people.

“We expect the donor community to step in to fill that gap and we are hopeful. But if they fail to do that, we will have to use some of our development budget to provide emergency assistance to our people.”

  • Can Ethiopia cope with worst drought in decades?

Earlier reports suggested that the Ethiopian government did not have the funds to cope by itself, although analysts have acknowledged it has got better at coping with droughts than in previous years.

The government allocated $381m (£300m) extra over the last two years, but aid experts have questioned whether this can be sustained for a third year.

Ethiopia is in a “dire situation”, according to John Aylieff of the World Food Programme.

“We’ve got food running out nationally at the end of June,” he told reporters on Friday.

“That means the 7.8 million people who are in need of humanitarian food assistance in Ethiopia will see that distribution cut abruptly at the end of June.”

His words were echoed by John Graham, of Save the Children

He told AFP news agency: “After [the food runs out], we don’t know what is going to happen. And without that basic food then you will have problem falling into severe malnutrition because people are not getting any food.

“These children become severely malnourished and that’s where you have a very dangerous situation.

Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Free Range Poultry Production Rising in Zimbabwe)

ZIMBABWE – The growing interest in indigenous foods by many Zimbabweans could be the break that local free-range poultry farmers have been waiting for in a market that has been dominated by hybrids.Over the past five years or so, numerous traditional food eateries have been opened, while hotels have been putting traditional dishes on their menu. This has served to push demand even in supermarkets as some people prefer to cook for themselves at home instead of spending a small fortune on one meal.

Such is the rising popularity for meals that include free-range chicken, guinea fowl, turkey, rabbit and duck meat to go along with traditional starches such as isitshwala samabele (sorghum) and brown rice.

While almost every household in rural areas has always kept free-range chickens for food and a few have sold a bird here and there to help raise money for use around the home, commercial free-range chicken production is a fairly new concept in most areas, according to Chronicle.

This has led to the rise of organisations such as the Zimbabwe Free-range Poultry Producers’ Association that seeks to help farmers take up free-range farming as a way to grow financial and food self-sufficiency in line with tenets of Zim-Asset.

ZFRPPA secretary general Beauty Jiji says free-range poultry farming can empower women and youths to produce enough to feed themselves and the nation thus creating employment as well as food self-sufficiency.

“Free range birds are natural, healthy and tastier than broiler chickens. So while broilers and layers are easier to produce, free-range products can competitively enter the market if given the chance,” she said.

Free-ranging is simple and economically viable when it comes to feeding and Ms Jiji’s organisation has been recruiting and training farmers on rearing free-range birds and other animals such as rabbits, goats and cattle. Farmers have also been taught cheap and easy ways to prepare feed for their birds.

Free range chickens can feed on a normal diet of grass, worms and bugs as they are allowed to freely roam about and access sunshine for long stretches of time each day. Enough time to source their daily protein is a requirement to ensure optimal growth.

There are, however plenty of others foods that free-range birds can feed on, which include small grains such as millet, sorghum and ground maize as well as fish meal, cotton seed, sunflower cake, maize germ and bone meal.

These are foods that farmers can grow and prepare on their own at minimum cost, and therefore, are affordable to rural farmers. Experts say farmers can actually produce enough small grains to feed themselves as well as their chickens thus reducing their food bill while reaping their nutritional benefits.

While most members of ZFRPPA are still producing on a small scale, Ms Jiji says there are some members who now have more than 3000 birds and have sourced markets for their produce.

The problem however has been maintaining a consistent supply once a market is found.

“We have the opportunity to supply the local market. Last year we got a deal to supply a local supermarket but we could not go back because our farmers failed to consistently supply the agreed number of chickens every week,” said Ms Jiji.

She said there is need to change the mindset of women and youths who are practicing free-range farming so that they understand how commercial production works.

“Once we have organised ourselves, we can then start to produce seriously and be able to meet demand consistently,” she added.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (What Is The Best Food And Drink To Help Students Focus?).

I t’s heads-down revision time for exams and dissertations. The pressure’s on, so you’ll want all the help you can get to aid your memory and raise your grades (without smart drugs or cheating). Nutrition experts say that eating well can make a real difference to your revision regime – so what brain-boosting food and drink do they recommend?How much caffeine is too much?

Coffee, green tea and energy drinks are staples of the all-night library stint. But how much caffeine is too much?

“Caffeine – particularly coffee – can have numerous benefits extending to cardiovascular health, insulin sensitivity,

prevention of type 2 diabetes and acting as a potent antioxidant,” says nutritional therapist Daniel O’Shaughnessy. “However, while caffeine may make you more alert, individuals can build up a tolerance meaning this is short-lived. Caffeine can also increase blood sugar and eventually lead to dips causing lack of focus and energy.”

“It’s also worth bearing in mind that people react differently to caffeine,” says nutritional therapist Joanne Crovini. It has the potential to increase levels of the stress hormone cortisol. “Some people can drink it at midnight and go straight to sleep, whereas other people get teeth clenching and feelings of anxiety after a small amount.”

Most adults can tolerate single doses of caffeine up to 200mg and a daily intake of up to 400mg without any concerns, nutrition scientist Sarah Coe says; a mug of instant coffee is around 100mg and a cup of tea is 75mg of caffeine. “Remember that energy drinks and some soft drinks contain caffeine too, and coffee from a coffee shop may be stronger than coffee made at home. As broad advice I’d say stop drinking caffeine by 2pm and have a maximum of two cups of coffee or equivalent a day, but be aware of your own reaction to it.”

Wholegrains

Wholegrain foods will stave off hunger (advice on cooking some of them can be found here). Examples include porridge and wholemeal bread. Crovini explains that combining wholegrain with protein will help keep blood sugar levels balanced, which is essential for mood and concentration.

O’Shaughnessy agrees. Buying grains in bulk with your housemates is a great way to save money, as is avoiding the more overpriced “fad” grains, he says. “Brown rice, oats and buckwheat are good, cheap alternatives,” he says, adding that the high levels of magnesium in buckwheat also helps to calm nerves.

Nuts and berries

Berries and nuts are a convenient snack that pack a nutritional punch. “Blueberries, like many dark coloured fruits and vegetables, have a high antioxidant content, which is thought to protect the brain from oxidative damage and slow age-related decline,” explains Crovini. Frozen berries are usually cheap, last longer and don’t lose their nutrients when frozen. Less healthy are flavoured and coated nuts, which contain added oil, salt and sugars.

Ditch the supplements

Doctors often recommend taking vitamin supplements to top up on the nutrients you need – but these can be expensive. Fortunately, they’re not the only option. “Food should always come before supplements and the key to getting as many nutrients as possible is to eat as varied a diet as possible, with lots of different colours,” says Crovini. “Use frozen berries and dark green vegetables like savoy cabbage, which are reasonably priced.”

Coe agrees: it’s better to get everything you need from food and drink: “For example, oranges not only contain vitamin C [which boosts the immune system] but also fibre and other components that you can’t get packaged together in a tablet.”

Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate has a mild effect on

increasing blood flow and reducing blood pressure, due to the polyphenol content, says Crovini. “It’s also a good source of magnesium, which is an essential mineral for relaxation.”

O’Shaughnessy recommends choosing chocolate that’s 80% or more in cacao to avoid any negative effects to teeth, skin and weight. The darker the chocolate, the less sugar in it.

Water

A recent study by the University of East London and University of Westminster found that keeping hydrated can boost attention by almost 25%. “We found that drinking even a really small amount of water (25 ml) resulted in improved performance on a test of attention,” says Dr Caroline Edmonds, who co-authored the research. Drinking 300 ml improves memory performance and can improve your mood as well.

The experts’ recommended library lunch.

Base your lunch on starchy foods, particularly wholegrain varieties, Coe says. Sandwiches, wraps and bagels are quick and easy to prepare, or you could use leftovers from the night before to make a pasta, rice or couscous salad.

Grainy salads with canned fish and vegetables are good if you don’t fancy bread. Tinned mackerel with beetroot, roasted sweet potato cubes, lots of green leaves like rocket or watercress and some pumpkin seeds, are ideal, Crovini says. Or try canned salmon with brown rice, canned chickpeas, chopped cucumber and tomato.

For sweetness, you’ll want the usual healthy stuff: a small pot of natural yogurt with either an apple, some berries or a chunk of dark chocolate.

Don’t skip meals, Crovini adds. Eating regularly will help keep blood sugar balanced and feed the brain with the fuel it needs.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Is In-flight food a health risk? let’s see)

You may have drooled over all those advertisements from many airlines that tout how tantalising their in-flight meals are – but are these promises just a flight of imagination on the airlines’ part?

A new book, Gastrophysics: The New Science Of Eating, has come out to back what many travellers have come to believe and tolerate – airline food is just edible, but is nothing much to write home about on a postcard supplied by the airline.

But they may not have known that the underwhelming in-flight meals are also a health risk as they have more calories.

“The lower cabin air pressure, dry cabin air and the loud engine noise all contribute to our inability to taste and smell food and drink,” the book’s author, Professor Charles Spence, a lecturer at Oxford University, told the Business Insider.

“Because sound suppresses sweetness perception, you have to add about 15 to 20 per cent more sugar to the foods we eat while in the air to give the same taste perception.”

According to Prof Spence, there are other factors to explain why passengers could end up at the destination airport heavier than when they first board the plane.

“There is the boredom,” he told the Daily Telegraph in another interview. “With nothing else to do, food becomes an appealing distraction. And when it is being offered for free, it will be even harder to resist.”

Many plane passengers would surely have noticed other people on board badgering the stewardess for second helpings, from bread to desserts, and regular servings of both alcoholic drinks and fruit juices.

This is despite knowing that the air in an aircraft is very dry and, coupled with the diuretic effect of drinking alcohol, they may become dehydrated much faster than on the ground.

The amount of eating and drinking is also driven by the in-flight entertainment. “Another really big problem is the movie or television show you watch,” said Prof Spence. “It is not uncommon to find people eating as much as a third more food with the TV show on.”

The figures, at least for British travelers, are not likely to put anyone on cloud nine,

Prof Spence’s book cites research which suggests that the average Briton consumes nearly twice the recommended daily intake of calories while heading to their destinations.

“It has been estimated,” he wrote, “that the British consume more than 3,400 calories between their check-in at the airport and their arrival at their destination.”

But while some airlines try to offer healthier options, the relentless dogfight for business – amid rivalry with budget airlines and pressure to keep ticket costs competitive – means that many players cannot afford to fly the extra mile for nutritional value.

“More often than not, though, the airlines have opted to load the food they serve with even more sugar and salt, to enhance the flavour,” Prof Spence told the Daily Telegraph.

“No surprise, therefore, that the food served these days isn’t the healthiest.”

Travel experts have noticed another ploy adopted by airlines – roping in celebrity chefs to give their menus a touch of glamour. Prof Spence is not impressed, however.

“I have yet to see any evidence to support the claim that the chef’s interventions… actually led to a significant increase in passenger satisfaction,” he wrote.

On this, he is backed by noted chef Gordon Ramsay who rarely minces his words.

“I worked for airlines for 10 years, so I know where this food’s been and where it goes, and how long it took before it got on board,” he told the Refinery29 website recently.

Most meals are made between 12 and 72 hours ahead of the time that they are dished out on the plane.

Professor Peter Jones, former professor of travel catering from Surrey University, told the Daily Mail: “It can be kept in a chilled stage for five days under the internationally recognised food hygiene standards.”

Ramsay’s method to beat the inflight food blues? Going for a snack at an Italian bar in the airport before his flight.

Meanwhile, disgruntled plane passengers are fighting back. They have documented shocking examples of in-flight food, complete with photographs.

Postings in a website called Airlinemeals.net have gone viral with the hundreds of images which show what is served at more than 9,000m.

But all is not lost, at least for those who fly on Asian airlines.

Indeed, the site’s anonymous founder and webmaster, a 35- year-old graphic designer from Holland, praises Asian airlines for their menus.

“I would say airlines from Asia get the best results… Singapore Airlines, Japan Airlines, Cathay Pacific, Thai Airways International, Emirates… and from my own experiences, I would like to add Qatar Airways and Vietnam Airlines,” he said. “‘They’re all top notch.”

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Kenya lags behind in exploiting potential in sea fishing)

The extent to which Kenya is yet to exploit its marine fishing potential is now clear, with the country being among the worst in Africa when it comes to sea fishing, a review of global fisheries data by Nation Newsplex shows.

Of the 38 African countries that have a coastline, only six landed a smaller catch of sea fish, crustaceans and molluscs than Kenya did in 2015.

According to data from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (Fao), Kenya landed a total of 8,496 tonnes from those three categories in 2015.

 

LEADING COUNTRIES

Even when the revised 2015 figure of 9,299 tonnes contained in the 2017 Economic Survey is included, Kenya’s ranking, which places it only ahead of Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Eritrea, DRC, Djibouti and Sudan, does not improve.

The biggest sea fishing country in Africa was Morocco, which landed 1.35 million tonnes, 159 times more than Kenya’s catch.

It was followed by South Africa (564,000), Namibia (507,000), Angola (457,702), Senegal (393,867), Mauritania (388,776), Nigeria (372,457), Ghana (243,181) and Mozambique (193,567).

Together, these nine countries account for three quarters of all the marine fish, crustaceans and molluscs caught by African countries.

In East Africa, Tanzania caught 61,304 tonnes, which was more than six times Kenya’s catch of 8,496 tonnes in 2015, while Somalia, which has faced protracted instability, landed 29,800 tonnes of sea fish.

According to Fao, Kenya could catch up to 300,000 tonnes of fish from the Indian Ocean sustainably every year, about 30 times the current catch.

OVERFISHING

Although freshwater fish currently make up 93 per cent of Kenya’s total catch, recent years have seen declines in the amount of fish landed, partly due to the overfishing of some species.

For example, from 2012 to 2016, Kenya’s freshwater catch fell 18 per cent, from 145,150 tonnes to 119,550 tonnes.

Lake Victoria, the source of 75 per cent of Kenya’s fish, accounted for 98,666 tonnes in 2016, a 10 per cent drop from the year before and a 31 per cent increase from the 143,908 tonnes landed in 2006.

Lake Turkana is the second largest single source of freshwater fish in Kenya.

However, its catch has dropped 58 per cent from 2009, when 9,445 tonnes were captured to 2016, when only 3,693 tonnes of fish were landed.

Although catches at man-made fish farms surged by almost 400 per cent to 24,000 tonnes from 2009 to 2014, they then fell by nearly 38 per cent to 14,952 tonnes in 2016.

Increasing imports of freshwater fish, particularly from China, show that local fisheries may not be adequate for the country’s needs.

Increasingly, Kenyans have seen Chinese fish on local supermarket shelves.

ILLEGAL FISHING

From 2014 to 2015, imports of fish from China grew 60.2 per cent from Sh624.1 million to Sh1.02 billion according to the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS).

As it races to increase its bounty from the sea, Kenya faces challenges from foreign fleets that fish far from their home countries.

In 2014, President Kenyatta said that Kenya loses Sh10 billion from illegal fishing in its exclusive economic zone.

According to research carried out by the University of British Columbia in Canada, the largest country fishing in African sea waters is China, which in 2011 had a catch of 3.1 million tonnes a year.

African waters constitute the largest distant water source of fish to China, more than Asia, where China landed one million tonnes, Oceania (980,000 tonnes), Central and South America (182,000 tonnes) and Antarctica (48,000 tonnes) the same year.

 

ARTISANAL FISHING

Earlier this year, the New York Times reported that China has a distant-water fleet of at least 2,600 boats, the largest search fleet in the world, and 10 times the United States’ own distant water fleet. Kenya has only one.

Fishermen in Kenya’s Indian Ocean coasts are ill equipped to respond to the fisheries from overseas.

Fao statistics from 2014 show that a total of 2,913 fishing craft were used actively in marine fishing, of which nearly half (47 per cent) were dugout canoes.

Dhows that are flat at one end made up 22 per cent. Other crafts included hori (11 per cent), Dau (9 per cent), ngalawa (6 per cent), mtori (3 per cent) and rafts (1 per cent).

 

FISHING ZONES
China is the world’s largest marine fishing nation, and landed 15,314,000 tonnes of fish in 2015, according to official Fao figures.

That accounted for 19 per cent, or nearly one in five of all the fish caught worldwide that year.

China caught more than double the next largest fishing country, which was Indonesia, at six million tonnes.

The United States, Peru and the Russian Federation round out the top five marine fishing countries in the world.

For purposes of statistical analysis, Fao divides the world’s seas into zones called fishing areas.

 

OFFSHORE PATROL

Kenya’s fishery is located in the Western Indian Ocean fishing area, which landed 4.66 million tonnes of fish in 2015.

However, much of that fish did not go to African countries.

For example, Kenya, which landed 9,929 tonnes according to revised data, and Tanzania which landed 61,304 tonnes, together constituted only 1.5 per cent of the total in the entire western Indian Ocean fishing area.

In the 2017-2018 budget, the government allocated Sh400 million for the development of designated ports where deep water vessels can land their catch, and the commissioning of an offshore patrol boat to deter illegal fishing.

According to a report by the National Treasury, the government also plans to create the Kenya Fisheries Service.

Mombasa County has also begun a boat construction programme through which it aims to construct 14 10-tonne boats for deep sea fishing.

According to an April 12 2017 report by Baraka FM, the first boat, MV Mombasa 001, had landed 6.1 tonnes of fish from eight voyages since its maiden voyage on November 24.

Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE ( Pegan Diet: Is It Paleo or Vegan Diet? What Is It Actually?)

Thousands of different diets are circulating through the internet in recent years, each promising exceptional results – but only a few of them are truly delivering on their promises. The Pegan Diet is a term that has been rising in popularity recently, and many, people have adapted to this diet. The diet mixes the healthiest elements of both the Paleo and Vegan diet; thus creating a diet that ensures the dieter achieves a perfect balance between nutrition, healthy fats and other essential compounds that the body needs to not only be healthy but also to function better. In this post, we’d like to focus on what exactly the Pegan diet is, as well as take a look at its benefits and drawbacks, to help you make a more informed decision as to whether or not this diet is suitable for you.

               What Is The Pegan Diet

Before we take a look at the pros and cons, as well as the food choices that you can choose from when you follow the Pegan diet, let’s take a quick look at what exactly this diet is. As we’ve mentioned previously, the diet is a combination of both a Vegan diet plan and a Paleo diet plan – many people are confused in this part as they think it is either one of the two. To better understand, let’s take a look at these two diets separately:

  • Vegan Diet – The Vegetarian Resource Group
    explains that a vegan diet is similar to a vegetarian diet, but in addition to excluding fish, poultry, and meat from their diet, vegans also exclude all kind of animal-related products from their diets and their lifestyle. This includes eggs and honey, as well as cosmetics, wool, leather and other products that contain animal by-products.
  • Paleo Diet – A Paleo diet, according to Nerd Fitness
    , is a diet that follows the tradition of “living like a caveman” about a person’s diet. This means a person who follows a Paleo diet would eat anything a caveman would be able to hunt for or gather, such as fruits and vegetables, fish, meat, seeds, and nuts. Anything that a caveman would not be able to gather or hunt for, such as cereal, candy, and pasta, should be eliminated.

CNN Health explains that the Pegan diet fundamentally requires the individual to adjust their diet in such a way that meats only account for 25% of their dietary intake and plants for the rest of the 75%. Unlike a vegan diet that would only require a vegetarian diet for weight loss, as an example, the Pegan diet would also require the person to consume some meat as well, even when used for weight loss.

The Benefits Of The Pegan Diet

Let’s take a look at some of the most beneficial advantages that you can obtain when you follow the Pegan diet.

  • The Pegan diet does not allow any dairy products to be consumed. While this might be difficult for some people to adapt to, it might have numerous benefits for you. Nutrition Studies
    explains that higher dairy intake has been linked to a higher risk of prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and type 1 diabetes.
  • Pegan dieting
    combines the healthiest elements of the Vegan and Paleo diet without bringing along any of the adverse impacts that any of the two diets have been associated with; thus you are giving your body healthy foods that will help it function better.
  • This diet is also perfect for people who have a little extra fat that seems to be stubborn as the combination of foods often helps to reduce stubborn fat around the stomach and buttock areas.


               The Drawbacks Of The Pegan Diet

Similar to how this type of diet has numerous benefits for the dieter, we should also focus on the drawbacks that this diet has.

  • The Pegan diet completely prohibits the consumption of dairy products, which might be very difficult for some people to adapt to.
  • This diet requires the consumption of organic meats only. These meats are much more expensive than non-organic meats, which means a person would need to have a larger budget to work on if they are switching from another diet to the Pegan diet.
  • Switching from a Vegan diet to a Pegan diet can be quite difficult as 25% of all food intake should be meat in this diet, but with a Vegan lifestyle, the person would be used to completely avoiding any animal-based products, including eggs and meat.

               What’s Allowed And What’s Not?

While we have discussed the most important aspects of the Pegan diet, we should also look at the foods that are allowed and, of course, the ones that are not allowed. We’ll also share some delicious meal ideas with you to help you get started.

Allowed Foods:

  • Certain fats that are considered to be of high quality. These fats are high in Omega-3 fatty acids. It includes olive oil, avocado oil, and coconut oil.
  • Lentils, but legumes, peanuts, pinto and other types of beans are not allowed.
  • Healthy grains like quinoa.
  • Grass-fed meat that comes from animals that are antibiotic-free (organic meat). Eggs, beef and other types of meat should not account for more than 25% of a person’s daily food intake.
  • Vegetables and fruit are vital for this diet and must account for 75% of all food that the person consumes daily.

Disallowed Foods:

  • Sugar should be avoided as much as possible. It is okay to consume something that contains sugar once in a while, but this should be seen as an occasional treat.
  • Dairy should be completely avoided if you intend to follow through on this diet plan as dairy might be difficult to digest.
  • Soy is also a food that should be avoided when following the Pegan diet plan.

Meal Idea

To help you get started, here are a few meal ideas that you can prepare while following the Pegan diet plan:

  • Vegan Ceaser Salad
  • Falafel
  • Gluten Free Carrot Cake
  • Chicken With Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Goat Cheese and Spinach

Final Words

While both the Vegan and Paleo diet is often considered to be two excellent choices when it comes to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, many people are now turning towards a Pegan diet, which combines the best elements of these two diets in one. The diet is healthy and has numerous benefits for the dieter, and can even help to reduce your risk of obtaining certain diseases and health conditions.

Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (FOOD SAFETY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITY IS A MUST IN AFRICA)

Some three years back there was a debate around the use of brine solution on chicken that is sold in fast food retail stores across the country. At the time we requested the Ministry of Health, which is the only regulatory authority, to provide us with specifications on the amount of brine that can be applied on chicken and other food
items such as beef.

There were no answers forthcoming from the ministry, except a brief statement that the companies using brine solution should do it with care.
This week, the Minister of Health, Dorcas Makgato stated that the some imported foods are responsible for the spread of non-
communicable diseases. Our country imports more than 50% of food items from neighbouring countries, especially South Africa.

Such imports include chicken, pork
and vegetables among others, which are not subjected to intense scrutiny when they are crossed into the country and ultimately into our plates.
Many, if not all fast food retail stores originate from South Africa, their preferred destination for importing food items including chicken, and pork and even beef,
which is in abundance in Botswana.

It is against this backdrop that we call for strengthening of laws and establishment of Food Regulatory Authority or Commission that will be mandated with ensuring that all the food that is in circulation in Botswana is safe for consumption. The body can go for benchmarking exercises in developed countries such as in the European Union where public safety is given priority than
anything else.

The body should set safe limits of
ingredients in food items and drink beverages, and any chemical or colourant found in food items. We should always remember the China infant milk scandal of 2008; the UK sausage scandal of
2012 and Robertsons spice
scandal of 2005 as events that
demonstrate the need for
comprehensive food safety laws.

The minister acknowledged
that we have good policies but many of them need to be strengthened and harmonised and responsive to current and emerging issues. As matter of fact, the minister was too embarrassed to state that several agencies scattered across ministries
mandated to protect the consumer are not effective.
These policies can only be enforced by an Authority that dedicates all its time to ensuring that the public is protected from
unscrupulous traders and individuals who are bent on making quick cash at the expense of unsuspecting members of the
public.

The Authority will also ensure that traders who erase expiry dates of canned foods are severely dealt with. We have long neglected
public safety and the time to act is nay or else we will wake up when it is too late to reverse the damage.

The minister should take leadership in ensuring that this Authority is established before the end of the eleventh Parliament
and that will be her legacy.

Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (GTBANK FOOD AND DRINK FAIR TO BOOST SMALL BUSINESSES)

As part of its continued efforts to inspire the entrepreneurial spirit of young Nigerians, Guaranty Trust Bank Plc, is currently providing opportunities to more
than 100 small businesses in Nigeria’s Food Industry through provision of free storefronts at the GTBank Food and Drink taking place in Lagos to commemorate the 2017 Worker’s Day.

The two-day event offers small businesses in the Nigerian Food Industry a free and vibrant platform to connect with a wider
segment of their target markets as well as experts in their business fields. Promoters of the fair told journalists in Lagos on Friday that the 2016 edition had over 90 exhibitors from the food sector and attracted more than 25,000 guests.

They promised that the 2017 edition will expand on the favourite features of the previous
event, such as MasterClasses led by
internationally renowned Chefs and Sales Exhibitions by small businesses. Assistant Manager and Group Head, Communications & External Affairs at the bank, Oyinade Adegite, said: “It will also
provide new and exciting features such as a Farmers’ Market, where SMEs involved in agriculture will showcase and sell fresh and
organic farm products, and a Baking Masterclass for children kids.

There will also be a diverse range of restaurants offering mouth-watering dishes, outdoor grills and thrilling entertainment as well as savoury wine tastings to enable attendees experience an exciting and eclectic mix of undiscovered brands and household names alike.

She further added that the exhibition will be free to attend and guaranteed an unparalleled food experience for everyone,
pointing out that all that is involved is online registration
It was also revealed at the press briefing that a wide variety of cuisines at the fair would be such that one can munch his or her way around the world.

“If you are a food lover, get set to loosen your belt for the gastronomic delights that will be served by a diverse range of restaurants offering mouth-watering dishes. If you love drinks, then prep your taste buds for savoury wine tastings and finely mixed cocktails.

“At the heart of the Food and Drink fair is the exhibition and sales by over hundred SMEs in the Nigerian food industry. Geared
towards promoting indigenous agriculture and supporting small businesses, the Exhibition will provide a platform for SMEs to showcase a wide variety of products ranging from fresh organic groceries to dry foods, confectionary and pastries, ready to eat consumables and drinks as well as top quality crockery,” she stated.

Meanwhile, in an earlier statement, the organisers had stated that there would be
cooking master classes, with the masters of cooking, including internationally renowned chef, Raphael Duntoye, chef patron of la petite maison, famous food and
fitness expert Kevin Curry and pop-up restaurateur – Lerato Umah-Shaylor. “Nothing better embellishes delicious foods than watching celebrity chefs prepare them live, and that’s exactly what you will get at the GTBank Food and Drink MasterClasses.

The MasterClasses will be led by
internationally renowned Chefs, such as, Raphael Duntoye, chef patron of la petite maison, famous food and fitness expert Kevin Curry, TV chef and pop-up restaurateur Lerato Umah-Shaylor and renowned food blogger, Jehan Powell.

Other Masterchef headliners include Ronke Edoho, founder of 9jafoodie.com, Nkesi Enyioha, owner of HSE Café, Chef Abiola
Akanji of Red Dish Chronicles and Chef Benedict Okuzu, the West African Chef Ambassador for German home appliance brand, “Miele.”

Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (UN TO CUT FOOD AID FOR NIGERIA CRISIS OVER LACK OF FUND)

The UN said four countries including Nigeria are facing a humanitarian crisis

Food aid will be cut for more than a million Nigerians affected by Boko Haram’s insurgency if promised funding from the international community does not arrive, according to a United Nations official. Peter Lundberg, the deputy UN humanitarian coordinator in Nigeria, wrote in the French newspaper Le Monde that just 15% of the UN aid appeal for one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises has been received.

Over the next six months, 242 million dollars (£193 million) is needed to help 1.8 million people, he said. “Without sufficient financing, the World Food Program (WFP) will have to reduce its vital support,” he wrote.

Half a million children in north-east Nigeria are suffering from severe malnutrition, Mr Lundberg warned. “Without treatment, one in five will die.” WFP’s Nigeria office did not respond to a request for more details on what aid would be cut and when.

Nigeria is part of what the UN has called the largest humanitarian crisis since the world body was founded in 1945, with more than 20 million people in four countries facing possible famine. The other nations are South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. Mr Lundberg said the UN has appealed for one billion dollars (£780 million) in aid this year for Nigeria, where an estimated 4.7 million people in the north-east are in urgent need of food aid.

Nigeria’s military has been fighting to win back areas that have been under the control of the Boko Haram extremist group. The Islamic insurgency in the vast north- east has disrupted both markets and farming, creating the hunger crisis.