Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (FG, UNIDO move to tackle foodborne illnesses in Nigeria)

The Federal Ministry of Health in collaboration with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) under the European Union (EU) sponsored Nigeria Quality Infrastructure Project (NQIP) on Wednesday commenced a two-day capacity building workshop on food safety practices for food and non-food handlers across Kogi State.

Daily Trust reports that participants at the workshop include farmers, food handlers, non-food handlers, consumer associations and other stakeholders in agribusiness, amongst others.

Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole, at the commencement of the training in Lokoja, said the initiative was designed to impart knowledge on food safety practices with a view to addressing the burden foodborne diseases emanating from consumption of unsafe food had had on the country in recent times.

The minister who was represented on the occasion by Anthonia Okpara, a director of food, water and chemical division in the ministry, noted that similar training would be held subsequently in other states of the federation in order to entrench the culture of food safety from the point of production, processing and packaging down to consumption.

He said the country had in recent years been plagued with preventable foodborne disease outbreaks such as cholera, typhoid fever, Lassa fever and methanol poisoning as well as presence of aflatoxin in nuts and series consumed by unsuspecting members of the public, hence the need to sensitise food handlers on the need to imbibe food safety culture and hygiene practices.

“Over the past 20 years, food safety has become one major topic globally in the health sector considering the impact of unsafe food on the population especially on children below the age of five years, immunocompromised as well as the elderly.

He said the training was imperative as it forms part of the strategies for the implementation of the National Policy of Food Safety which amongst others aims at promoting safe food practices at the grassroots, improve the safety and quality of farm produce; reduce the foodborne disease burden of the country and also reduce the rate of rejection of food produced in the country at the international trade.

UNIDO’s National Expert on Food Safety, Tehinse John, said the training would go a long way in enhancing the acceptability of Nigeria’s agricultural products in the international market.

“This project is to build the capacity of Nigerians to be able to supply good and safe food products to the international market. We realise that of late that majority of our products, particularly Agric products are not allowed in the international market due to safety concerns.

“This project is aimed at correcting all the anomalies by building the capacities of stakeholders to produce goods that meet international requirements. Kogi State has been identified as one of the states that have potential to lead in Agric business. We feel that if the state is able to get it right in terms of improving food safety culture, then we will be able to improve agribusiness in the state,” he said.

On his part, Kogi State Governor Yahaya Bello said the need for education on food safety could not be over emphasised, saying that the quality of people’s depend largely on the quality of food they eat.

The governor, who was represented by his deputy, Elder Simon Achuba urged the participants to take the training seriously and ensure they imbibe food safety culture at the end of the day.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (What to know about food allergies in children)

Food allergy occurs, when the body immune system sees certain foods as harmful, thereby causing an unpleasant reaction. Food allergies can cause serious and deadly reactions in kids, if not properly handled. Dr. Oluwafunmilayo Funke Adeniyi, a paediatrician in the Department of Paediatrics, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) discussed food allergies in children, what triggers it and how to reduce the risk of kids developing it. GERALDINE AKUTU reports.

What is food allergy?
Food allergy is a clinical condition, where the body makes antibodies (Immunoglobulin E (IgE)) to a specific food. The job of the body’s immune system is to identify and destroy germs, such as bacteria or viruses that make you sick. A food allergy results, when the immune system mistakenly targets a harmless food protein – an allergen – as a threat and attacks it. Initial exposure to the food may not produce severe reaction, but the child may become sensitised and when the food is next eaten (or sometimes just comes in contact with the skin), it triggers an immune system response, which results in the release of histamine and other substances in the body. These cause various symptoms, depending on where in the body they are released.

Signs and Food allergy
The following are the signs and symptoms of food allergy regardless of the allergen:
Skin system: swelling, itching, warmth, redness and rashes, 
Respiratory system (breathing): coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain/tightness, throat tightness, hoarse voice, nasal congestion or hay fever-like symptoms (runny itchy nose, watery eyes and sneezing), difficulty in swallowing.

Gastrointestinal system (stomach): nausea, pain/cramps, vomiting, diarrhoea and some children may actually pass blood in the stools.

Cardiovascular system (heart): pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, and shock. Others: older children may describe anxiety, feeling of “impending doom”, headache, and metallic taste. The most dangerous symptoms of an allergic reaction, which is usually referred to as anaphylaxis are:

• Difficulty with breathing caused by swelling of the airways, including a severe asthma attack for people, who have asthma.
• Drop in blood pressure, causing dizziness, light-headedness, feeling faint or weak, or passing out. Both can lead to death, if untreated.

Having said this, it is important to note the symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, which are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms and very rarely, sudden collapse i.e. anaphylaxis.

How long does it take to have allergy in children?
An allergic reaction usually happens within minutes after exposure to an allergen, but sometimes it can take place several hours after exposure to the allergen. In children with the immune mediated or IgE mediated food, allergy symptoms occur within minutes up to two hours after ingestion of the food. These symptoms usually recur on exposure to the food on every occasion and may be mild or severe, associated with anaphylaxis. The symptoms of ‘classic’ allergy, as such, are rashes, wheezing, itching, severe gut symptoms or (very rarely) sudden collapse.

What are the most common food allergies in children?
Allergy can occur to a single food or to many foods. Allergy to many foods is a more severe form of allergy, and is referred to as multiple food allergies.
The common allergenic foods i.e. food that induce allergies, include cow’s milk, dairy products, egg, seafood (fish and shrimps), wheat, soy and peanuts. The commonest food allergy in children is cow’s milk.

Is there a cure for food allergy?
There is no direct cure for food allergy. The condition is best managed with elimination diet i.e. avoidance or exclusion of the offending food from the diet and subsequent substitution. For example, in a child with cow’s milk protein allergy, the milk should be removed from the child’s diet and a substitute in the form of soya milk, or hydrolysed formula (i.e. milk that the protein has been broken down to peptides) or amino acid formula, which can readily be digested and does not cause reactions in the child.

When the child is up to six months and weaning is commenced, solids should be introduced gradually and one food at a time. This should be from the least allergenic foods, i.e. cereals, then vegetables and fruits, then chicken, eggs, fish and lastly nuts.

How can parents handle their children’s food allergies?
If a severe allergy has been identified in a child, it is important the parents ensure that the child avoid even the tiniest amounts of the trigger food. Very occasionally, reactions can occur, even when the child has had skin contact with the offending food. A fish-allergic person may react by being in a kitchen, where fish is being cooked. The parents should do gradual introduction of the allergenic foods in infancy, as described earlier.

Children, parents and caregivers should be educated on common ingredients, reading food labels and how to safely avoid allergens. Children and parents should also be aware of appropriate, safe, cost-effective, freely available and nutritionally adequate substitutes for the avoided foods.

As well as avoiding the offending food, the allergic child should be provided with appropriate emergency treatment, should accidental exposure occur. Depending on the severity of the reaction, this may be adrenaline to be given by injection, antihistamines, steroids, or all of these. The exact details of such treatment will need to be decided by the doctor in charge of the child. The parents should ensure that an allergy specialist or dietician, who is experienced in food allergies and paediatric gastroenterologist, sees the child regularly.

Children affected by severe food allergy can still participate in all normal activities, school, work or leisure, but the parents should give appropriate support and understanding.

Can a child outgrow food allergies?
Usually, children who have cow’s milk allergy become tolerant of cow’s milk, as they grow older and outgrow their allergy by the age of two to three years. Children are usually re-evaluated at regular intervals to see if they have developed tolerance. Generally, younger children with milk, soya and egg allergy are reviewed every six to 12 months and older children every one to two years. Tree nut, fish and shellfish allergy may be life long, but re-evaluation should be performed every two to four years to determine whether re-challenges are appropriate or exclusion needs to be continued.

Foodie Update, Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Why we should stop eating wheat foods)

We will take a brief vacation today from the ongoing running series on CHRONIC INSOMNIA AND TRAINLOAD OF TROUBLES, which has run in two parts. The series is yielding ground to two publications, which have been making the rounds in many chat groups on the social media, including some of the friendship groups to which I belong.

When I first read about the dangers of eating wheat, I almost responded like a Doubting Thomas. Wheat?, I wondered. We have eaten wheat since goodness knows when! Until the Nigerian bread market became fraudulent, mixing white flour with wheat flour and passing it off as whole wheat flour and bread, I ate wheat bread for breakfast almost everyday. The shocking discovery is that man has now done to wheat what they have done, and are doing, to other food crops, modifying them from the way Mother Nature gave us these food crops and transforming them into states that would make them grow faster, more resistant to infections, keep longer and yield more money in the market. Quite naturally, the transformation alters, also, the natural ratios in which the constituents co-exist, and yield new radiations which the body now has to adapt to.

The second article, on asparagus, a long-known kidney cleansing herb, is considered for a mention in this column in the state in which it has been lifted from the social media because it may have, as suggested, an important role to play in the cure of cancer and other diseases which plague us today not only in Nigeria but worldwide.

My apologies go to the authors of these articles and to other original sources, which may have been lost through posting and reposting on the social media. Because of this it is not possible to give them their due credit for the publication. Nevertheless, I thought of republishing them because it is the wish of this authors and sources that this be done because of the health they believe doing so will afford the health of humanity

Foodie Naja Update, Foodie Update, Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE (Blockchain seen as tool in food safety)

The food industry is turning to the same technology used by virtual currencies to strengthen food safety and inventory management by tracking meats and crops from farm to table.Working with IBM, retail giant Wal-Mart Stores is testing the technology system on mangos in the United States and pork in China.

Blockchain, the underlying technology behind virtual currency bitcoin, is a digital system that allows counter parties to transact using individual codes for goods.

“I see a lot of potential to create what I call a digital and transparent food system,” said Wal-Mart food safety vice president Frank Yiannas.

The technology enables different parties in the supply chain to share details such as the date an animal was slaughtered or the weather conditions at harvest time.

Data can be stored through a photograph on a smartphone that is transmitted onto a dedicated platform.

The system also can also counter fraud and mistaken deliveries, champions of the technology say.

“The advantage of blockchain is that the ledger is immediately updated and all the parties have access to the latest information,” said Bill Fearnley, Jr. an expert at market intelligence firm IDC.

Supporters of blockchain are especially keen to address salmonella and other food safety problems that can cause health scares that weigh on corporate reputation and damage sales.

The technology allows a more efficient response if there is a problem, enabling companies to locate the source of an incident more quickly, Yiannas said.

He pointed to a 2006 case where it took hundreds of investigators and two weeks to identify the source of bad spinach under a paper-based system.

But blockchain “reduces tracing from days to seconds,” Yiannas said. “The more accurately you can track food, the better.”

Demand for transparency

The other great virtue of blockchain is enhanced transparency by letting consumers look up key information on where food comes from, an asset amid growing concerns about genetically-modified crops and artificial ingredients.

That additional transparency also can help promote more desirable practices.

British online startup Provenance used blockchain technology to test tuna caught in Indonesia to help corroborate claims the fish were responsibly caught.

The technology also has been embraced by companies in the jewelry business to fight the sale of so-called “conflict diamonds,” which come from war-torn regions.

“Our goal is to provide transparency at every step of a diamond’s journey and ultimately re-shape the way we trade diamonds globally,” said Leanne Kemp chief executive of Everledger, a British company that tracks diamonds from the mines to jewelry stores.

But to completely function as a system, all the parties need to participate, Fearnley said.

Danish shipping giant Maersk estimates the technology could save billions of dollars by eliminating fraud and incorrect deliveries. It is testing the technology with container ships between Kenya and the Netherlands.

But the transition will require investment. A refrigerated product raised in Africa and shipped to Europe requires at least 30 people with some 200 interactions among parties, including customs, taxes, and food safety oversight.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (What Is The Best Food And Drink To Help Students Focus?).

I t’s heads-down revision time for exams and dissertations. The pressure’s on, so you’ll want all the help you can get to aid your memory and raise your grades (without smart drugs or cheating). Nutrition experts say that eating well can make a real difference to your revision regime – so what brain-boosting food and drink do they recommend?How much caffeine is too much?

Coffee, green tea and energy drinks are staples of the all-night library stint. But how much caffeine is too much?

“Caffeine – particularly coffee – can have numerous benefits extending to cardiovascular health, insulin sensitivity,

prevention of type 2 diabetes and acting as a potent antioxidant,” says nutritional therapist Daniel O’Shaughnessy. “However, while caffeine may make you more alert, individuals can build up a tolerance meaning this is short-lived. Caffeine can also increase blood sugar and eventually lead to dips causing lack of focus and energy.”

“It’s also worth bearing in mind that people react differently to caffeine,” says nutritional therapist Joanne Crovini. It has the potential to increase levels of the stress hormone cortisol. “Some people can drink it at midnight and go straight to sleep, whereas other people get teeth clenching and feelings of anxiety after a small amount.”

Most adults can tolerate single doses of caffeine up to 200mg and a daily intake of up to 400mg without any concerns, nutrition scientist Sarah Coe says; a mug of instant coffee is around 100mg and a cup of tea is 75mg of caffeine. “Remember that energy drinks and some soft drinks contain caffeine too, and coffee from a coffee shop may be stronger than coffee made at home. As broad advice I’d say stop drinking caffeine by 2pm and have a maximum of two cups of coffee or equivalent a day, but be aware of your own reaction to it.”

Wholegrains

Wholegrain foods will stave off hunger (advice on cooking some of them can be found here). Examples include porridge and wholemeal bread. Crovini explains that combining wholegrain with protein will help keep blood sugar levels balanced, which is essential for mood and concentration.

O’Shaughnessy agrees. Buying grains in bulk with your housemates is a great way to save money, as is avoiding the more overpriced “fad” grains, he says. “Brown rice, oats and buckwheat are good, cheap alternatives,” he says, adding that the high levels of magnesium in buckwheat also helps to calm nerves.

Nuts and berries

Berries and nuts are a convenient snack that pack a nutritional punch. “Blueberries, like many dark coloured fruits and vegetables, have a high antioxidant content, which is thought to protect the brain from oxidative damage and slow age-related decline,” explains Crovini. Frozen berries are usually cheap, last longer and don’t lose their nutrients when frozen. Less healthy are flavoured and coated nuts, which contain added oil, salt and sugars.

Ditch the supplements

Doctors often recommend taking vitamin supplements to top up on the nutrients you need – but these can be expensive. Fortunately, they’re not the only option. “Food should always come before supplements and the key to getting as many nutrients as possible is to eat as varied a diet as possible, with lots of different colours,” says Crovini. “Use frozen berries and dark green vegetables like savoy cabbage, which are reasonably priced.”

Coe agrees: it’s better to get everything you need from food and drink: “For example, oranges not only contain vitamin C [which boosts the immune system] but also fibre and other components that you can’t get packaged together in a tablet.”

Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate has a mild effect on

increasing blood flow and reducing blood pressure, due to the polyphenol content, says Crovini. “It’s also a good source of magnesium, which is an essential mineral for relaxation.”

O’Shaughnessy recommends choosing chocolate that’s 80% or more in cacao to avoid any negative effects to teeth, skin and weight. The darker the chocolate, the less sugar in it.

Water

A recent study by the University of East London and University of Westminster found that keeping hydrated can boost attention by almost 25%. “We found that drinking even a really small amount of water (25 ml) resulted in improved performance on a test of attention,” says Dr Caroline Edmonds, who co-authored the research. Drinking 300 ml improves memory performance and can improve your mood as well.

The experts’ recommended library lunch.

Base your lunch on starchy foods, particularly wholegrain varieties, Coe says. Sandwiches, wraps and bagels are quick and easy to prepare, or you could use leftovers from the night before to make a pasta, rice or couscous salad.

Grainy salads with canned fish and vegetables are good if you don’t fancy bread. Tinned mackerel with beetroot, roasted sweet potato cubes, lots of green leaves like rocket or watercress and some pumpkin seeds, are ideal, Crovini says. Or try canned salmon with brown rice, canned chickpeas, chopped cucumber and tomato.

For sweetness, you’ll want the usual healthy stuff: a small pot of natural yogurt with either an apple, some berries or a chunk of dark chocolate.

Don’t skip meals, Crovini adds. Eating regularly will help keep blood sugar balanced and feed the brain with the fuel it needs.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE (Is In-flight food a health risk? let’s see)

You may have drooled over all those advertisements from many airlines that tout how tantalising their in-flight meals are – but are these promises just a flight of imagination on the airlines’ part?

A new book, Gastrophysics: The New Science Of Eating, has come out to back what many travellers have come to believe and tolerate – airline food is just edible, but is nothing much to write home about on a postcard supplied by the airline.

But they may not have known that the underwhelming in-flight meals are also a health risk as they have more calories.

“The lower cabin air pressure, dry cabin air and the loud engine noise all contribute to our inability to taste and smell food and drink,” the book’s author, Professor Charles Spence, a lecturer at Oxford University, told the Business Insider.

“Because sound suppresses sweetness perception, you have to add about 15 to 20 per cent more sugar to the foods we eat while in the air to give the same taste perception.”

According to Prof Spence, there are other factors to explain why passengers could end up at the destination airport heavier than when they first board the plane.

“There is the boredom,” he told the Daily Telegraph in another interview. “With nothing else to do, food becomes an appealing distraction. And when it is being offered for free, it will be even harder to resist.”

Many plane passengers would surely have noticed other people on board badgering the stewardess for second helpings, from bread to desserts, and regular servings of both alcoholic drinks and fruit juices.

This is despite knowing that the air in an aircraft is very dry and, coupled with the diuretic effect of drinking alcohol, they may become dehydrated much faster than on the ground.

The amount of eating and drinking is also driven by the in-flight entertainment. “Another really big problem is the movie or television show you watch,” said Prof Spence. “It is not uncommon to find people eating as much as a third more food with the TV show on.”

The figures, at least for British travelers, are not likely to put anyone on cloud nine,

Prof Spence’s book cites research which suggests that the average Briton consumes nearly twice the recommended daily intake of calories while heading to their destinations.

“It has been estimated,” he wrote, “that the British consume more than 3,400 calories between their check-in at the airport and their arrival at their destination.”

But while some airlines try to offer healthier options, the relentless dogfight for business – amid rivalry with budget airlines and pressure to keep ticket costs competitive – means that many players cannot afford to fly the extra mile for nutritional value.

“More often than not, though, the airlines have opted to load the food they serve with even more sugar and salt, to enhance the flavour,” Prof Spence told the Daily Telegraph.

“No surprise, therefore, that the food served these days isn’t the healthiest.”

Travel experts have noticed another ploy adopted by airlines – roping in celebrity chefs to give their menus a touch of glamour. Prof Spence is not impressed, however.

“I have yet to see any evidence to support the claim that the chef’s interventions… actually led to a significant increase in passenger satisfaction,” he wrote.

On this, he is backed by noted chef Gordon Ramsay who rarely minces his words.

“I worked for airlines for 10 years, so I know where this food’s been and where it goes, and how long it took before it got on board,” he told the Refinery29 website recently.

Most meals are made between 12 and 72 hours ahead of the time that they are dished out on the plane.

Professor Peter Jones, former professor of travel catering from Surrey University, told the Daily Mail: “It can be kept in a chilled stage for five days under the internationally recognised food hygiene standards.”

Ramsay’s method to beat the inflight food blues? Going for a snack at an Italian bar in the airport before his flight.

Meanwhile, disgruntled plane passengers are fighting back. They have documented shocking examples of in-flight food, complete with photographs.

Postings in a website called Airlinemeals.net have gone viral with the hundreds of images which show what is served at more than 9,000m.

But all is not lost, at least for those who fly on Asian airlines.

Indeed, the site’s anonymous founder and webmaster, a 35- year-old graphic designer from Holland, praises Asian airlines for their menus.

“I would say airlines from Asia get the best results… Singapore Airlines, Japan Airlines, Cathay Pacific, Thai Airways International, Emirates… and from my own experiences, I would like to add Qatar Airways and Vietnam Airlines,” he said. “‘They’re all top notch.”

Naija Foodie Update

FOODIE NAIJA UPDATE ( Pegan Diet: Is It Paleo or Vegan Diet? What Is It Actually?)

Thousands of different diets are circulating through the internet in recent years, each promising exceptional results – but only a few of them are truly delivering on their promises. The Pegan Diet is a term that has been rising in popularity recently, and many, people have adapted to this diet. The diet mixes the healthiest elements of both the Paleo and Vegan diet; thus creating a diet that ensures the dieter achieves a perfect balance between nutrition, healthy fats and other essential compounds that the body needs to not only be healthy but also to function better. In this post, we’d like to focus on what exactly the Pegan diet is, as well as take a look at its benefits and drawbacks, to help you make a more informed decision as to whether or not this diet is suitable for you.

               What Is The Pegan Diet

Before we take a look at the pros and cons, as well as the food choices that you can choose from when you follow the Pegan diet, let’s take a quick look at what exactly this diet is. As we’ve mentioned previously, the diet is a combination of both a Vegan diet plan and a Paleo diet plan – many people are confused in this part as they think it is either one of the two. To better understand, let’s take a look at these two diets separately:

  • Vegan Diet – The Vegetarian Resource Group
    explains that a vegan diet is similar to a vegetarian diet, but in addition to excluding fish, poultry, and meat from their diet, vegans also exclude all kind of animal-related products from their diets and their lifestyle. This includes eggs and honey, as well as cosmetics, wool, leather and other products that contain animal by-products.
  • Paleo Diet – A Paleo diet, according to Nerd Fitness
    , is a diet that follows the tradition of “living like a caveman” about a person’s diet. This means a person who follows a Paleo diet would eat anything a caveman would be able to hunt for or gather, such as fruits and vegetables, fish, meat, seeds, and nuts. Anything that a caveman would not be able to gather or hunt for, such as cereal, candy, and pasta, should be eliminated.

CNN Health explains that the Pegan diet fundamentally requires the individual to adjust their diet in such a way that meats only account for 25% of their dietary intake and plants for the rest of the 75%. Unlike a vegan diet that would only require a vegetarian diet for weight loss, as an example, the Pegan diet would also require the person to consume some meat as well, even when used for weight loss.

The Benefits Of The Pegan Diet

Let’s take a look at some of the most beneficial advantages that you can obtain when you follow the Pegan diet.

  • The Pegan diet does not allow any dairy products to be consumed. While this might be difficult for some people to adapt to, it might have numerous benefits for you. Nutrition Studies
    explains that higher dairy intake has been linked to a higher risk of prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and type 1 diabetes.
  • Pegan dieting
    combines the healthiest elements of the Vegan and Paleo diet without bringing along any of the adverse impacts that any of the two diets have been associated with; thus you are giving your body healthy foods that will help it function better.
  • This diet is also perfect for people who have a little extra fat that seems to be stubborn as the combination of foods often helps to reduce stubborn fat around the stomach and buttock areas.


               The Drawbacks Of The Pegan Diet

Similar to how this type of diet has numerous benefits for the dieter, we should also focus on the drawbacks that this diet has.

  • The Pegan diet completely prohibits the consumption of dairy products, which might be very difficult for some people to adapt to.
  • This diet requires the consumption of organic meats only. These meats are much more expensive than non-organic meats, which means a person would need to have a larger budget to work on if they are switching from another diet to the Pegan diet.
  • Switching from a Vegan diet to a Pegan diet can be quite difficult as 25% of all food intake should be meat in this diet, but with a Vegan lifestyle, the person would be used to completely avoiding any animal-based products, including eggs and meat.

               What’s Allowed And What’s Not?

While we have discussed the most important aspects of the Pegan diet, we should also look at the foods that are allowed and, of course, the ones that are not allowed. We’ll also share some delicious meal ideas with you to help you get started.

Allowed Foods:

  • Certain fats that are considered to be of high quality. These fats are high in Omega-3 fatty acids. It includes olive oil, avocado oil, and coconut oil.
  • Lentils, but legumes, peanuts, pinto and other types of beans are not allowed.
  • Healthy grains like quinoa.
  • Grass-fed meat that comes from animals that are antibiotic-free (organic meat). Eggs, beef and other types of meat should not account for more than 25% of a person’s daily food intake.
  • Vegetables and fruit are vital for this diet and must account for 75% of all food that the person consumes daily.

Disallowed Foods:

  • Sugar should be avoided as much as possible. It is okay to consume something that contains sugar once in a while, but this should be seen as an occasional treat.
  • Dairy should be completely avoided if you intend to follow through on this diet plan as dairy might be difficult to digest.
  • Soy is also a food that should be avoided when following the Pegan diet plan.

Meal Idea

To help you get started, here are a few meal ideas that you can prepare while following the Pegan diet plan:

  • Vegan Ceaser Salad
  • Falafel
  • Gluten Free Carrot Cake
  • Chicken With Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Goat Cheese and Spinach

Final Words

While both the Vegan and Paleo diet is often considered to be two excellent choices when it comes to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, many people are now turning towards a Pegan diet, which combines the best elements of these two diets in one. The diet is healthy and has numerous benefits for the dieter, and can even help to reduce your risk of obtaining certain diseases and health conditions.

Foodie Update

FOODIE UPDATE ( Are Avolattes Real? Find Out.)

There was a time when I really liked avocado. When I ate guacamole and chips like it was no big deal. That was before, of course. Before avocados became avocados, and the consumption of this once-delicious treat was like an entrée into a secret club I was in no way prepared to join. The club of hipsters, who took the simple avocado and turned it into a replacement for basically everything. Some say these crafty hipsters are even serving up hot beverages inside avocados these days. A few skeptics don’t believe these so-called avolattes are real, but I know me a few hipsters. And honestly, I put nothing past them.

According to Cosmopolitan, a cafe in Australia has started serving up warm beverages in the hollowed out husk of an avocado. The Truman Cafe in Melbourne — a vegetarian/vegan restaurant — is reportedly the culprit behind the unique avolatte. Apparently, they like to serve up a perfectly yummy latte inside something they were meant to throw into the compost bin like a bunch of earth-friendly hooligans. I don’t know what makes me scratch my head more about this — the fact that avocados have somehow taken over yet another food and beverage domain or the name the good folks at the Truman Cafe use for the avocado husk: the “vegan cup.”

Whether or not the avolatte takes off in the good old U.S. of A. remains to be seen. Judging by much of the response on the internet, decider of all things, it could really go either way at this point. Some are ready to embrace all questionable trends from 2017, and the two that seem to be going together are lattes served in avocados and rompers for men. Will wonders never cease?

Food

CREAMY PEPPER DIP

                                      OUR SPIRITUAL FOOD
“LOVE THE MEASUREMENT OF YOUR SPIRITUAL MATURITY”
Your maturity as a Christian is measured by the love of God that you express to others.
The new creation is created to love not to hate. You can only give what you have and the more you have a thing, the more you give. So therefore learn to love and give more often than you receive.

Hello again, I am back. Now let’s get on with today’s article.
Today’s article is on “CREAMY PEPPER DIP”.
The key to a delicious low- fat dip is switching from high fat cream cheese and yogurt to non-fat versions. Now when I am preparing this dip I love it with fresh cut red peppers, carrots and celery. Most times I use broccoli as well. This is one dip I just get addicted to most of the time. You too can give it a try. Stay back and relax while we get it going.
THINGS YOU NEED KNOW ABOUT CREAMY PEPPER DIP
Creamy Pepper Dip’s Standard Recipes contains 105 calories from 10g fat (58% of calories). While it’s Fat Make Over contains 100 calories from 1.8g fat (16% calories).
NUTRITION FACTS
1g Protein
4% Vitamin A
10% Vitamin C
2% Calcium
5g Carbohydrate (2%)
5g Cholesterol (2%)
Remember the amount per-serving is 105 calories from 58-60 percent daily values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower, it all depends on your calorie needs. All set now down to the main biz.

RECIPES
i. 1 red onion (well chopped)
ii. 2 teaspoons olive oil
iii. ¾ cup drained water
iv. Packed chopped roasted red peppers
v. 3 ounces non-fat cream cheese
vi. 6 tablespoons non-fat plain yogurt
vii. 2 tablespoons fat-free Italian dressing.
viii. 2 carrots (not necessary needed)
ix. Celery (for garnishing)

 

x. 2 cups mayonnaise

xi. 1 cup buttermilk

xii. 2 teaspoons garlic salt

xiii. Assorted fresh vegetables (for serving)

xiv. Ridged potato chips

 
PROCEDURES
1. In a clean small no-stick skillet oven, set a medium-high heat and sauté the onions in the oil for 6-8 minutes or till it becomes tender.
2. Transfer it to a food processor and add the peppers, cream cheese, yogurt, mayonnaise, buttermilk  and carrots and dressing.
3. Process until they become smooth, after that transfer into a clean serving bowl, cover it and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving it. While serving you can add the celery (if you want)
This Makes 8 Servings

Serve with any vegetables or with potato chips.
Well done, that’s it. You are there! Enjoy your dip. Till next Thursday.
This is where I drop my pen. Bye for now.

Food

ONUNU (RIVERS STATE POUNDED YAM AND PLANTAIN)

Today on the blog is “ONUNU”.

Onunu is another delicacy from
Rivers State. What i love about it is the way it is prepared. What i mean there is, we all know pounded yam right? I’m sure we do, but this one is yam pounded with boiled plantains and then finished off with Palm oil and fresh pepper, that is if you wish to add it.

Onunu mostly is served with a spicy fish pepper soup. But i just decided to prepare this recipe alone for this post, to showcase Rivers State Rich delicacy and surprisingly, it came out just as expected, though it’s served with native soup. To me, based on my own findings and practical Onunu can as well be served with any local soup of your choice, it must not be basically with fish pepper soup.

RECIPES NEEDED
i. Yam
ii. Ripe plantain
iii. Palm oil
iv. Fresh pepper (optional)

PROCEDURE
1. Slice the yam, wash it thoroughly and boil, when it is cooked, about half way, add the ripe plantains.

2. If you follow the steps, You will be amazed that you will enjoy it in a 70- 30% ratio of yams to plantain. Before you pound it, be certain that both the yams and the plantains are well cooked (soft). Then bring it down

3. In a clean mortar and pestel, Start pounding the yams first because of its pulp and stretchy nature, as soon as it starts getting smooth, add the plantain. You know since it’s a traditional food you need do it the traditional way.

N/B: Tho we are in modern day i so i will advice you to go for a food processor where you have the hook/blade or even a hand mixer, instead of a mortar inorder to save yourself from the trouble of having to pound yourself.

* Which ever one you choose to use is up to you, but remember to first pound the yams to a pulp, before the plantains, after that finish it off with the dough tool.

4. Once both Recipes is in a smooth consistency, add the amount of fresh pepper you want (that is if you wish to add it this is the time to add it, before the oil). Now add little palm oil, while the mash is still hot, so it can take away that curdling taste of the palm oil.

5. Finish off the pounding, until the palm oil is well blended, now changing the colour to yellow and that’s it, you finally have Onunu on your table ready for consumption. It is very sweet, the way the plantain is mashed with the yam.

Happy Cooking!!! Thanks for your time see you all next week! Happy Easter In Advance